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Wrongful Termination Attorney in Arizona

Arizona Wrongful Termination Lawyer

Arizona Wrongful Termination Lawyer

Being fired from a job can be emotionally and financially devastating. The termination can be particularly damaging when the firing is not warranted.

You could have a legal remedy if your rights were violated and you were wrongfully terminated. Under state and federal wrongful termination laws, you could be eligible for compensation that includes back pay, attorney’s fees and other damages.

The skilled and experienced Arizona wrongful termination lawyers at Matt Fendon Law Group can determine whether you have a case. If so, we can advise you on your options and how to proceed.

If you believe you have been wrongfully terminated in Arizona, contact the knowledgeable and compassionate Arizona employment attorneys at Matt Fendon Law Group. We have experience filing lawsuits over wrongful terminations by employers. We will clearly explain the laws surrounding illegal firings and pretextual false terminations. We will explore whether your employer has engaged in illegal conduct, and we will explain all your legal options.

Call us today to schedule a confidential consultation.

Can You Sue for Wrongful Termination?

Arizona is an “at-will” employment state, which means that an employer or an employee can end an employment relationship for any reason – or for no reason. This applies even in situations where the employer is being unfair when firing an employee. However, laws make it illegal to fire an employee for certain reasons. If you were fired illegally, you can file a wrongful termination lawsuit against your employer.

If you were wrongfully terminated, you can file a lawsuit and seek compensation for:

  • Compensatory damages
  • Attorney’s fees
  • Compensation for lost wages
  • Continuation of benefits
  • Classification of the termination as resignation

Grounds for Wrongful Termination

Below are some examples of wrongful grounds for termination that we often see in Arizona:

  • Discrimination

According to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, employers are barred from terminating an employee on the basis of their:

    • Race
    • Sex
    • Age
    • Nationality
    • Religion
    • Disability

If you believe you have been the victim of workplace discrimination, you may file a discrimination charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). That charge must be filed within 300 days of the alleged discriminatory act. You can also file your claim within 180 days with the Arizona Civil Rights Division (ACRD) of the Attorney General’s Office.

After you file a discriminatory claim, the agency you filed a claim with will conduct an investigation. After the investigation, you may receive a “right to sue” letter, which gives you 90 days to sue your employer. If you fail to file a lawsuit by the 90-day deadline, you lose your right to sue for discrimination.

  • OSHA Complaint

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) law, employers must provide a safe workplace for their employees. This involves adhering to safety rules and regulations. Employers must:

    • Intermittently examine the workplace to make sure it’s free of hazards.
    • Provide safety training to all employees.
    • Offer medical examinations when necessary.
    • Make the OSHA regulations poster visible to all workers in a common area.
    • Show workers how to properly store and dispose of hazardous chemicals.
    • Use a color code, labels, posters or signs to warn workers of potential dangers.
  • Wage and Hour Dispute

Wage and hour laws protect employees by governing the wage rates an employer can pay, and the hours for which employees must be compensated. These laws cover issues such as overtime, mandatory meal and rest breaks, minimum wage, tips, excess hours, vacation and sick leave, and severance. Arizona follows the federal law known as the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

  • Qualified Time Off

Arizona employees have the right to take time off for civic duties. An employer may not terminate an employee for exercising such rights and duties as:

    • Voting in an election
    • Serving on a jury
    • Serving as a member of the military if the employee is called to active duty or required military duties

Arizona workers get mandatory earned sick leave under the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act. Under that act, they cannot be terminated for:

    • Recovering from a medical condition
    • Caring for an injured or sick family member
    • Caring for a newborn child
    • Attending to legal matters
    • Missing work due to domestic violence, sexual violence, or stalking
  • Retaliation

Arizona law prohibits termination of an employee who reports an employer for attempting to force the employee to act illegally. Also, an employer cannot terminate a worker out of retaliation for asserting these rights:

    • Filing a workplace discrimination claim.
    • Testifying against an employer in court.
    • Filing a workers’ compensation claim.
    • Filing a whistleblower claim.

What to Do If You Are Wrongfully Fired

If you believe you were wrongfully terminated, take these steps to protect your rights:

  • Write down the events that led up to the termination. Note any warning signs, if applicable. Note whether any of your coworkers were terminated.
  • Write down the reason your boss provided for terminating you. Also note whether your boss said something that struck you as discriminatory.
  • Pay attention to what happened after you were wrongfully terminated. Note whether you made any attempts to try to keep your job.
  • Contact an experienced Arizona wrongful termination lawyer to discuss the specifics of your case.

How an Arizona Wrongful Termination Attorney Can Help You

The experienced Arizona attorneys for employee termination at Matt Fendon Law Group can help with your wrongful termination claim. We are ready to:

  1. Provide helpful advice. An experienced wrongful termination attorney has handled many cases similar to yours. An employment lawyer knows the ins and outs of the law and can use experts from various fields to help with your case.
  2. Interpret complex state and federal laws. Employment laws can be complicated and confusing. A wrongful termination lawyer can explain those laws in simple terms and determine whether you have a case.
  3. Collect important evidence. During the investigative process, a wrongful termination attorney will review discovery documents and determine what’s relevant to your case. An attorney can also gather witnesses to have them answer important questions in your case.
  4. File motions. If your boss makes damaging allegations against you that are untrue, a wrongful termination lawyer can file motions to stop them.
  5. File with the EEOC or ACRD. A wrongful termination attorney can file a wrongful discharge lawsuit, a breach of contract claim, and, if necessary, file a discrimination claim with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or the Arizona Civil Rights Division.

Contact Us

If you believe your employment termination was unlawful, seek help from one of our Arizona unfair termination lawyers.

The highly skilled and experienced illegal termination lawyers at Matt Fendon Law Group will review the facts of your case. Our lawyers know Arizona employment termination laws, and we have helped many clients with unlawful termination lawsuits. We will look at your employment case and the applicable laws. We will determine whether you may have a claim against your employer for breach of contract or wrongful termination.

Call now to schedule a confidential consultation.

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